Janet Cramb & Company/LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Janet Cramb on 4/28/2021


Photo by Scott Webb from Pexels

Potential new homebuyers have the choice of buying a starter home or a forever home. The details mean something different to everybody, but a starter home is usually regarded as a short-term living situation if you canít afford your dream home yet. Some choose to wait until they can afford their forever homeóthe home they imagine living in for the rest of their lives. How do you know which option is best for you? Here weíve put together some pros and cons of buying a starter home so you can contemplate the choice.

Pros of Buying a Starter Home

Affordable - Price is among the most common reasons new homebuyers go with a starter home. These homes are lower priced, which allows you to purchase right away instead of saving up for a much more expensive home. Depending on the area a starter home might have lower property taxes.

Lower Commitment - The whole idea of a starter home is to only live in it temporarily, which takes some of the pressure out of the decision for first-time homebuyers. Homeownership is a big change from renting and it can be a hard change. A starter home can provide a sense of easeóafter all, you can always move somewhere else in a few years. Thatís the whole idea!

Potential Future Investment - If you buy a starter home, you can keep it as an investment property even after you move out into a larger forever home. You can rent out the property to generate extra side income and potentially help the home appreciate in value.

Cons of Buying a Starter Home

Smaller - Starter homes are smaller than forever homes. This is related to the lower price, but also the idea that the homeowner might just be starting a new life. Maybe you donít have any kids but are planning on it far enough in the future that you donít need multiple bedrooms. Maybe you are buying a home to share with housemates for a shorter time due to work opportunities. Whatever the reasons may be, the smaller size of a starter home will make it difficult to grow your family or for situations where you might need more space down the road.

More Work - Starter homes are often older and in need of some maintenance. This also contributes to a lower price. You might find that buying a starter home also means buying a lot of home improvement projects. This can be expensive, time-consuming and stressful for new homebuyers. Itís important to get an inspection before making the purchase so that you can identify any serious maintenance red flags.

Hard to Sell - Some starter homes can be a challenge to sell when youíre ready to move. Whether itís because of the condition of the home or because itís in a less than desirable location, thereís a chance it might take some effort (and some money put into improvements) to sell.

If youíre not sure about whether to go for a starter home or wait for a forever home, consider your future and priorities. You canít plan for everything, but the more you look ahead the better decisions you can make for your first home.





Posted by Janet Cramb on 10/9/2019

Moving to your new home can either be a fun experience or a very stressful time, depending upon how you choose to manage it. Deliberately preparing yourself for the entire process is one definite way of making sure that the moving experience is a fun one for you. Follow these simple ideas to change your home with ease.

  • Find a moving company: Unless you insist on doing the move yourself, you might be better off with a professional moving company. Ask for good recommendations and decide on one mover that is well within your budget. Schedule a date for the moving with the company when you finally pick one. You can begin this about two months before you have to leave, to give you enough time to wrap up the process.
  • Sort and purge: Decide what you want to move to your new home. Some items will probably be too old or useless where you are going too, so you should sell, give to your neighbors or donate to charity. During this period, you should also work on exhausting things that you won't move, such as perishable food items or cleaning supplies. Ideally, you should start doing this about six weeks before your moving date.
  • Start Packing: At about a month to your moving date, you should start packing your non-essential items into boxes. Things that you donít use frequently should be the first to go in your boxes. Make sure you mark each carton with a label that identifies what is in the box and what room it's going to in your new home. As your move date draws nearer, pack everything you no longer need until you settle in at your new home at once.
  • Clear out your home: If you have storage facilities outside your current home, like a garage or shed, you should start clearing them out for the move. You want to avoid forgetting something that might turn out to be very important. Wash, dry and pack up all your clothing too. Don't forget to return any items you may have borrowed from neighbors in the past.
  • Final arrangements: In the last days before you leave, go round your house a few times to be sure you are not leaving anything behind. Pack a night bag that you can live out of, pending when you finally settle in at your new home. If using professional movers, ask them for wardrobe boxes to make it easier to unpack your clothes when you arrive. If you need recommendations on moving companies, ask around at the next neighborhood meeting. 

With a plan of action like this, changing your home would not be stressful. Your realtor makes it even less stressful by helping you time closing and moving dates.




Tags: moving tips   new home   family  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Janet Cramb on 5/10/2017

The next house that you move into is going to meet all of your family's needs. There's a large fenced back yard for your children to run and play in. Gone are the days when you worried that your kids would play too close to the street because your old home had such a small yard. Your new home even has an extra bedroom, the very space that you've always wanted to accommodate family and friends when they visit.

Moving into a house shouldn't be a nightmare

Yet, you're dreading moving. This isn't your first go round. You know how much work there is to move from one house to another. With forethought and planning, you can start to remove the dread out of the move.

How can you pull this off? Start taking these steps:

  • Create a house move checklist. You could download a checklist off the Internet and revise it.
  • Contact utility companies and have your utilities turned off at your current residence and turned on at your new house.
  • Complete and submit a change of address form to the post office. You can complete and submit a change of address form online.
  • Use sturdy plastic containers or boxes to pack your belongings in.
  • Move in several short trips if you're moving across town. For example, you could pack and move enough belongings to fill two to three rooms in one day and another several rooms in another day.
  • Price moving supplies and a moving truck more than a month before your move. Give yourself time to save enough money to cover the entire cost of the move.
  • Return rented electronics like cable boxes to the appropriate company. Schedule to have electronic services turned on within a few hours after you move into your new house.
  • Contact trustworthy relatives or friends and make arrangements to have your young children and pets watched while you move.
  • Clean your new house at least one day before you move. Give yourself enough time to clean without feeling stressed or like you'll fail and not get the house cleaned before you have to vacate your current house.
  • Remind yourself that you can always return to your old neighborhood and visit should you start to feel nostalgic or as if you're losing something by moving out of your current house into a new home.

Confidence plays a huge role in your next house move

Because moving to a new home brings change into your life, you may likely experience some discomfort as you pack and move to your new house. Advance planning can build your confidence. Advance planning can assure you that you have the knowledge and the skills to create a rewarding move situation.

That same level of confidence could also save you money. As you do what it takes to believe in your ability to pull off and adjust to the move, you may put your hand to more do-it-yourself work, saving yourself the expense of hiring and paying for contractors. Most of all, you could shorten the time it takes to move and get unpacked at your newer residence.




Tags: new home   house move  
Categories: Uncategorized